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IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2012 PHOTOS AVAILABLE ON FLICKR AND FACEBOOK - SHARE YOUR OWN


Missed IALD Enlighten Americas 2012? Attended and forgot your camera? We've got you covered - check out the IALD photos of the event on our Flickr page, or login to Facebook and check out our photo album. Tag yourself and share your favorites!
 

If you have any unique photos of Enlighten Americas that you'd like to share, please send them to Jessica Burke, IALD Marketing + Communications Coordinator, at jessica@iald.org. We'd love to see the conference through your eyes!



RICHARD SEYMOUR'S KEYNOTE, LET THERE BE LIGHT, INSPIRES A RECORD NUMBER OF ATTENDEES


Richard Seymour at Enlighten Americas 2012More than 370 lighting design professionals - designers, manufacturers, students and press - attended IALD Enlighten Americas 2012 from 11-13 October. This year's exciting conference location - Vancouver, BC Canada - and theme - SPEAKING OF LIGHT - combined to bring this record-breaking number to Enlighten Americas.

Richard Seymour, London-based product designer of the firm SeymourPowell, kicked off the conference with a keynote address, "Let There Be Light," that attendees called "powerful," "inspiring," "frightening," and "amazing."

IALD Enlighten Americas 2012 - Keynote AudienceProviding a fresh, non-lighting perspective to a room full of lighting professionals, Seymour's perspective on innovative product design showed how lighting professionals can interpret and leverage their place in a designed world. 

Beginning by sharing his own perspective on lighting, Seymour discussed some of his most inspiring experiences interacting with light from both a professional and personal point of view. How does light behave in the universe - and how does it shape our perceptions? 

Richard SeymourHe continued by discussing his own career as a product and industrial designer, and speculated on the role design - and designers - play in shaping the future. Technology, Seymour stated, isn't the problem in creating a bright future - it's what's lacking in the imagination of designers. "We are not limited by technology," he emphasized. "We are limited by our imagination."

Seymour's perspective on lighting was an inspirational call to action. "Personalized lighting," he said, "is coming our way. We'd better be ready, because if we don't create it, someone bad will."

But much of what Seymour spoke about was abstract and described the work of all designers in shaping the future. "What is the Designer's Oath?" he asked the audience, comparing it to the Templar's Oath and urging the crowd to think about what drives them to design - and their responsibilities to humanity as designers of our lived environments.

The talk challenged attendees and sparked a lively question and answer session at the end of Mr. Seymour's talk. Attendees were abuzz about the session throughout the conference, and many noted it as one of the highlights of the weekend. "Richard Seymour blew me away," said one attendee. "He opened my eyes to a new future. Keynote speakers at Enlighten Americas have always been entertaining and inspiring, but Mr. Seymour's presentation raised the bar markedly."



SPECIAL RECOGNITION AND REMARKS AT IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS

As a key annual touchstone for members of the IALD, Enlighten Americas is a fabulous opportunity for the association to recognize special volunteers and contributors to its success.

 

fellowsrecognitionFELLOWS RECOGNITION

2012 Fellows InductionThe IALD was pleased to induct four members to the IALD College of Fellows. The IALD Fellows designation is awarded to members of the IALD for valuable contribution to the art and science of lighting design, and for their continued service to the IALD. Fellows are professional members with a minimum number of ten years of experience. The following Fellows were formally inducted at Enlighten Americas 2012:

 

STEFAN GRAF, FIALD

Illuminart

Ypsilanti, Michigan USA

 

BARBARA HORTON, FIALD

Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design Inc

New York City, New York USA

 

JEFFREY I.L. MILLER, FIALD

Jeff Miller & Company Inc

Seattle, Washington USA

 

GERD PFARRÉ, FIALD

pfarré lighting design

Munich, Germany

 

Only Barbara Horton and Jeff Miller were in attendance at the conference, but all four Fellows were recognized with a special presentation of their credentials and work. 

 

A special, invitation-only reception was also held on Friday, 12 October for Past Presidents and Fellows of the IALD.

 

volunteerrecognitionIALD VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION

The IALD is lucky to have a stellar group of volunteers on its various Boards, Committees, and Task Forces. A number of these volunteers were recognized - through special recognition, plaques, and printed materials - at Enlighten Americas 2012. 

 

Thanks again to:

  • Scott Hershman, for completing a term as Co-Chair of the LIRC Steering Committee.
  • Diane McNabb Rodriguez, Associate IALD, for completing four years of service as the IALD International Lighting Design Awards Chair.
  • Katherine C. Abnernathy, IALD; Kenneth Douglas; David Ghatan, IALD; Barbara Horton, FIALD; and Andreas Schulz, IALD, for completing their terms of service on the IALD Board of Directors.
  • Lance Bennett; Lara Cordell; Steven Rosen, IALD; and Katherine C. Abernathy, IALD, for completing their terms of service on the IALD Education Trust Board of Directors.
  • Glenn Heinmiller, IALD, for serving as chair of the Energy & Sustainability Committee.

enlightenPAGENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2012 PROGRAMME ADVISORY GROUP

The Programme Advisory Group is responsible for planning and advising the educational content of the IALD annual conference. Thanks to this year's group, who worked tirelessly to plan one of the most successful conferences to date:

CHAIR
Jeffrey Miller, IALD 

Cy Eaton
Hank Forrest, IALD
Rick Leeds
Julie Neville, Associate IALD
Gerd Pfarre, IALD
Cindy Vera
Galina Zbrizher, IALD 

mintzremarksREMARKS FROM IALD FOUNDING MEMBER DAVID MINTZ, FIALD

David Mintz, FIALDAt the annual business meeting and luncheon on Saturday, 13 October, founding IALD member David Mintz, FIALD, made a few special remarks to the assembled. After joking that the first IALD annual meeting could have been held in a phone booth, he went on to tell a bit about the history and formation of the IALD. 

David described the passion for lighting shared by the founding members - but admitted that the initial goal of the association was to band together to try to get affordable health insurance. While that never quite came to fruition, the founding members of the IALD shared a fervent believe in working independently, and, as David said, "gave selflessly of their time and talents."

In describing the growth of the association, David said, "I can assure you that we did not envision a worldwide organization with hundreds of members, an Education Trust, international educational conferences, and participation in [a tradeshow like] LIGHTFAIR [International]." 

brandstonlightartRECREATION OF HOWARD BRANDSTON'S LIGHT & CHANGE

Light & Change - Howard Brandston, FIALD

LIGHT & CHANGE - HOWARD BRANDSTON, FIALD

Phil Gabriel, FIALD, who co-presented a seminar on Light Art As Inspiration for Lighting Design at Enlighten Americas 2012, brought a recreation of a 1967 art piece by Howard M. Brandston, FIALD, entitled "Light & Change." Gabriel intended the piece as a visual supplement for attendees of his session - and as an enjoyable replica of light art history for all attendees.

This legendary piece, Brandston wrote, "was created to give the viewer who lingers in their observation of its motion a sense of tranquility. The subtle change that occurs is almost imperceptible and is usually different when returning after being away for any period of time."

The original piece was shown at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, MI USA in 1967; the Milwaukee Art Museum in Milwaukee, WI USA in 1967; and the Howard Wise Gallery exhibit, "Lights in Orbit," in New York, NY USA in 1968.

Attendees at the conference were often seen lingering near the recreation, which occupied a prime location near the registration desk.



SECOND EMERGING LIGHTING DESIGN PROFESSIONALS INITIATIVE BREAKS ITS OWN RECORD, BRINGS 42 NEW DESIGNERS TO ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS

Emerging Lighting Designers Reception 2012This year marked the second year of the Emerging Lighting Design Professionals Initiative, a program created in 2011 by the Lighting Industry Resource Council (LIRC). Financial and budgetary constraints can make it difficult for a lighting design practice to support the continuing education necessary for training its junior staff. In response to this need, the LIRC is making a focused effort to financially support designers within their first five years of on-the-job practice to attend IALD Enlighten Americas.

Emerging Lighting Designers 2012Bringing to Vancouver 42 designers that would otherwise not have been able to attend the conference, the program was a resounding success for the second year in a row. "Without the Emerging Professionals program," said one attendee, "I would not have been able to attend. It allowed me to make a lot of great connections."

 

The LIRC also sponsored a reception for Emerging Lighting Designers on Thursday evening - this reception allowed the designers to meet their supporters and network with other participants from around the world. Attendees commented that the presence of so many fresh faces gave the conference a "great energy."

 

Fifteen different LIRC-member manufacturers contributed funds to the program:

 


EMERGING LIGHTING DESIGN PROFESSIONALS INITIATIVE SUPPORTERS 

SUPPORTING SIX DESIGNERS

Vode Lighting

 

SUPPORTING FOUR DESIGNERS

Visa Lighting

Xicato

 

SUPPORTING THREE DESIGNERS

Cooper Lighting

Erco Lighting

Finelite Inc

Lutron

Osram Sylvania

Soraa

 

SUPPORTING TWO DESIGNERS

A-Light

B-K Lighting + TEKA Illumination

Edison Price

Specialty Lighting Industries

 

SUPPORTING ONE DESIGNER

Lighting Services Inc

Lumenpulse

 

For a full list of emerging lighting designers and more information on the program, CLICK HERE.

 

 

ENLIGHTEN ATTENDEES AGAIN ENJOY LIGHTING CROSS TALK - "SPEED DATING" FOR LIGHTING SPECIFIERS AND MANUFACTURERS


Lighting Cross Talk 2012Enlighten Americas 2012 again featured the popular Lighting Cross Talk session - held in the afternoon on Friday to allow attendees two full hours to meet with manufacturers. Twenty-two manufacturers and more than 150 specifiers participated in the session.

 

Lighting Cross Talk is held in a round table format to allow for fast-paced information gathering. Lighting Cross Talk 2012Manufacturers set up at separate tables in a large ballroom and have 25 minutes to speak to five or more specifiers at a time. Manufacturers take this time to introduce new products, get feedback on existing products and discuss other specifier concerns.

 

Specifiers say they love the rapid-fire session format and the opportunity to speak to representatives from multiple companies. It's a great opportunity for frank, direct communication with manufacturers - if products need tweaking or don't work as intended, specifiers can provide feedback based on their experiences and be heard.

 

The IALD would like to thank all of the manufacturers and specifiers who participated in this year's Lighting Cross Talk.

 

LIGHTING CROSS TALK PARTICIPANTS

ACUITY BRANDS

B-K LIGHTING + TEKA ILLUMINATION

COOPER LIGHTING

CREE

ERCO LIGHTING

ETC

FOCAL POINT

GE LIGHTING

KURT VERSEN COMPANY

LIGHTING SERVICES INC

LUTRON ELECTRONICS CO

MECHOSYSTEMS INC

OSRAM SYLVANIA

PHILIPS DAY-BRITE

PHILIPS LIGHTOLIER

PHILIPS LUMILEDS

SISTEMALUX

SPECIALTY LIGHTING INDUSTRIES

TIVOLI LLC

TRAXON TECHNOLOGIES

XICATO

ZUMTOBEL LIGHTING


 
STUDENT ATTENDEES GET HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE, PORTFOLIO REVIEWS, AND SPECIAL WORKSHOP AT IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS

 

Students at Enlighten 2012Each year, IALD Enlighten Americas is pleased to welcome the best and brightest lighting students to participate in hands-on student activities and to network alongside lighting professionals from around the world. With more than 25 students in attendance at the conference, IALD Enlighten Americas 2012 provided students with an unforgettable lighting experience.

 

LightPlay Project 2012Students were given all day on Thursday for their first activity - LightPlay, a lighting design charette in which students are guided by leading designers and educators. This year, the students' task was to build a light fixture based on any genre of music they chose. The four groups were as creative as always - urban music, tribal music, flamenco dancing, rap and jazz were all represented in the fixtures created.

 

RAP-Sody in Light

RAP-SODY OF LIGHT

At the end of the activity, students set up their fixtures on the Perspectives Level of the hotel, and revealed them to meeting attendees at the President's Opening Reception sponsored by Cooper Lighting. Guests at the reception purchased tickets to submit their votes for their favorite models, and a small team of judges was also selected to provide a panel opinion. This year, the judges and the audience agreed on a favorite, "Rap-sody of Light," a project that reminded the judges of Billie Holiday. Boasting the loose organization of a jazz composition, the fixture utilized an exciting anachronistic mixture of an old school reflector with new, colorful LED technology. Ticket sales raised more than $1,000 USD for the IALD Education Trust.

 

In addition to LightPlay, students enjoyed a portfolio review session during the afternoon networking break on Friday. During this session, students were advised by emerging, mid-career and seasoned professionals alike. 

 

Student Workshop 2012Mark Roush, former IALD Education Trust president, also taught a student workshop on Friday afternoon. The workshop focused on getting involved in the lighting design world and discovering the kind of careers students could focus on as they left school. Emphasizing the value of networking and learning alike, Mark's session was lively and well-received.

 

Students consistently give IALD Enlighten Americas high marks and want to attend again once they enter the lighting field as professionals. One remarked, "The opportunity to network with professionals around the world was very beneficial. Learning their different perspectives was interesting." Another shared, "Great presentations - I really appreciated the diversity of topics."

 

The IALD and the IALD Education Trust would like to thank the supporters of LightPlay:

LIGHTPLAY 2012 Supporters 

 
STUDENT REVIEWS OF EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS FROM STUDENT PERSPECTIVES

Enlighten Americas 2012 featured three concurrent seminar tracks in Art, Science, and Professional Tools. To read full summaries of each session, please click on the appropriate links. Thank you to all students who volunteered to write a summary; to contact a student via email, please click on their names.

ART TRACK

BETWEEN ART AND ARCHITECTURE - Presenter: Jan Edler
THE ART OF BECOMING A LIGHTING DESIGNER - Presenter: Laura Sudbrock
LIGHT ART AS INSPIRATION FOR ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING DESIGN - Presenters: Phil Gabriel, FIALD; Glenn Shrum, IALD
THE LIGHTING DESIGNER VS CONSUMERISM - Presenter: Emrah Baki Ulas
ON CREATIVITY : ALL I WANT TO DO IS... - Presenter: Dante Comoglio

SCIENCE TRACK

EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON HEALTH - Presenter: Anjali Joseph, Ph.D.
ENERGY MODELING - Presenter: Elizabeth Gillmor, Associate IALD
ILLUMINATING THE FUTURE OF LIGHTING - Presenter: Mark Lien
EMERGING TECHNOLOGY : CONVERGENCE OF LEDS AND DIGITAL CONTROLS - Presenter: David Ranieri
COLOR SPACES AND PLANCKIAN LOCI - Presenters: Naomi Miller, FIALD; Michael Royer, Ph.D.

PROFESSIONAL TOOLS TRACK

THE CARE AND FEEDING OF AN ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING DESIGN PRACTICE - Presenter: David Mintz, FIALD
SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE LIGHTING DESIGNER - Presenters: Paul Beale, IALD; Cindy Foster-Warthen; Jennifer Jones, CAE
PUBLIC POLICY AND ENERGY & SUSTAINABILITY UPDATE - Presenters: Glenn Heinmiller, IALD; John Martin, Ed.D.; Peter Raynham
PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF YOUR DESIGN BUSINESS - Presenters: Stephen Brown, IALD; Denise Fong, IALD; Jeffrey I.L. Miller, FIALD; Kevan SHaw, IALD
INTO THE LIGHT : VISION, TRANSITION AND GROWTH - Presenters: Michael Bernard, Faith Jewell, Alice Prussin, IALD


THE ART OF BECOMING A LIGHTING DESIGNER
Presenter :  Laura Sudbrock
By Morgan Danner, Renneslaer Polytechnic Institute

Laura Sudbrock was an excellent speaker and example to students and young professionals about the varying phases of becoming a lighting designer. She connected with the audience by giving them a recollection of her transitions from student, to intern, to designer at the lighting design firm Licht Kunst Licht in Bonn, Germany. This presentation showcased the projects she did through school and into her internship experiences that led her to be prepared for the working world. She showcased projects from in class to designing outside the school.

Her wide background of school projects led her to diverse internships from Wisconsin to Ottawa. These experiences were the most helpful in shaping her future. They opened her up to new cultures, travels and ways to design within a project team. Due to her diverse internships, Laura was able to become a team member at Licht Kunst Licht.

Her articulation of these steps illustrates the hard work and dedication you must make to become a lighting designer and certain experiences you must embark on in order to expand your capabilities and outlooks as a designer. She let the audience know that no matter the experience, it shapes you into your future and morphs you into the designer you will become. Therefore, to become the designer of your dreams you must open yourself up to as many experiences, projects and jobs as you can to form network connections and expansive design knowledge.


LIGHT ART AS INSPIRATION FOR ARCHITECTURAL LIGHTING DESIGN
Presenters: Phil Gabriel, FIALD; Glenn Shrum, IALD
By Yulia Tyukhova, University of Nebraska
The Saturday morning art track session took the audience to the world of vivid examples of light as an art form. Light is viewed as a medium for the investigation of visual perception. The presenters talked about the interaction of forms and light, shapes and color, by showing the works of James Turrell, Dan Flavin, Howard Brandston, and many more. The speakers explored the creation of three-dimensional forms with lighting; playing with light and shadow; lighting hardware as an element of the deisgn idea; consideration of lighting in space and time - all of these create a lighting environment with a unique style.

These eye-catching, not ordinary lighting effects are challenging to apply in usual spaces such as offices, healthcare or educational institutions. But comfort and beauty are not always the criteria for lighting spaces. For example, a fast-food place lighting makes people want to move and eat faster, which is the opposite for warm and intimate restaurant lighting. Great lighting design considers the purpose of the space, the needs of the occupants, and it is visually interesting. The goal of a lighting designer is to learn the emotional response of the occupants that arise in these extraordinary environments and to carefully translate the concept of sometimes bold lighting to the "regular" space.

By Stephanie Deckard, The Pennsylvania State University
"Light Art" was my favorite presentation over the whole weekend. I had never been exposed to those artists' pieces of work before, so I got a lot out of it. I loved the variety, that some artists used natural means like daylight as their art, while others used enclosure rooms with crazy colors to get their messages across.

Not only was it interesting seeing the light art, but also how the professionals in the audience responded. They each had different backgrounds in lighting design and therefore different interpretations and opinions about the art.
 
THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON HEALTH
Presenter: Anjali Joseph, Ph.D.
By Lorin Bordeville, Kwantlen Polytechnic University

Anjali Joseph's seminar sparked elevated debate in a packed room at this year's Enlighten Americas. The topic of The Effects of Lighting on Health focused primarily on healthcare applications; however, it also re-affirmed industry research in other sectors such as office and residential design. Especially interesting was Dr. Joseph's participation in the science behind Philips' ambient MRI system. The process and results of that project alone would be an inspiring discussion.

A gracious and well-spoken presenter, a need for application interpretation was established. As leading MBAs and marketing professionals start using design process to strengthen their proposals, designers must themselves consider integrated design processes (IDP) to benefit the largest audience. Certainly what Dr. Jopseh established was what's needed: more research on the effects of circadian-based lighting, increased participation of test-groups that bridge the research gap between healthcare and other design applications, and design-specific case studies that can be applied to a variety of environments and design considerations. The human need for daylight and views is not new, but understandingw hy we need them will inform future design criteria. Why is the primary foundation for every good design solution.


ENERGY MODELING
Presenter: Elizabeth Gillmor, Associate IALD
By Yucheng Lu, The Pennsylvania State University

Energy modeling stands for the computer simulation of buildings. It reflects the interaction between building system, utility and occupant. Energy model is also a powerful tool of analyzing the annual energy cost. However, the analysis from an energy model should not be seen as the building's actual performance. As with the MPG listed on a car, in real life there are always more factors that must be considered. Still, energy models offer a relatively accurate result that can be used as reference during design.

From a designer's perspective, the benefit energy modeling can bring is essential. By analyzing the energy efficiency of possible designs, energy modeling informs the designer of possible energy performance to help him or her make reasonable decisions. With proper energy analysis, designers can also check if the design matches code and LEED requirements. Typical application of energy modeling is to build a basic design first that matches the minimum limit of ASHRAE standards. After that designers can design as they like and compare the result with the standard model.

For modelers, there are several points worth noticing. One is that for most energy modeling programs, model import from CAD is available. However it is not wise to import the original building model directly into the software since many components required by typical contract documents are excess for energy analysis. Also, for energy modeling, rooms are specified by zones. All the analysis is conducted by zone. For fixtures affecting on multiple rooms special consideration is required. Once the designed is processed, it is difficult to rearrange zone layouts so modeler should communicate with designer well before start modeling. Lighting schedules can be created to reflect the fixture used. Fixture schedule should be kept consistent between base model and future design models.

The simulation method about day lighting differs depend on the software. IES<VE> and Equest are two software relatively efficient on daylight analysis. From energy modeling It is possible to export daylight calculation by specific hour. Glare level can also be set up to check if the light level goes too much at any time during the day. While default geological data is available, user can also import customized weather data if available.

Generally speaking, energy modeling is a powerful tool that helps designers to generate a reasonable design. However software available for energy modeling is still in a relatively immature state and the coordination of energy modeling and popular BIM modeling system are relatively weak. Autodesk is working on creating an energy modeling app for Revit. When that is finished, I believe more potential for energy modeling will be discovered.


ILLUMINATING THE FUTURE OF LIGHTING
Presenter: Mark Lien
By Catherine Leskowat, University of Oklahoma

Mr. Lien presented a quick-paced, fascinating overview of new technologies and strategies for lighting design. "Crisis and revolution are the primary drivers of change," Lien explained, as he compared the size of the first edition of the IES Handbook to the newest edition, noting the impact finite supplies and increasing consumption has had on our industry as illustrated by the considerably larger newest edition thanks to the sections on solid state lighting and energy efficiency.

Lien was an engaging speaker, driving home each point with poignant statistics, myriad images, and a little magic. To illustrate the rapid advances in technology over the last couple centuries, Mr. Lien waved about an 5" floppy disk, comparing it to SD card which now carries thousands of times the data, making storing that bulky edition of the IES Handbook a thing of the past, at which point, said volume burst into flame, and those who did not bolt upright, at least leaned forward in their seats, curious what was to follow.

Behind some of the major changes in lighting as we knew it, are more stringent Government regulations such as mandatory energy audits - already in place in some states - and mandatory posting of energy consumption of businesses on websites. In order to meet the lower power density required by these regulations, Lien notes the trend toward focusing on task lighting and the use of daylight especially in ""box"" stores such as Wal-Mart.

Lien sees a paradigm shift from lighting as an electrical field to lighting as a concern of biology and quantum physics. Lien littered his entire presentation with introductions to fascinating alternatives to lighting as we knew it such as QLEDs, Graphine (only one atom thick, unbelievably light, translucent and luminous,) constantly expanding research in bioluminescence, triboluminescence (a lighting phenomenon which occurs when certain materials are crushed or ripped apart,) and wireless electricity transmission.  BMW's research into blue lasers was followed up by a demonstration of a blue laser interacting with phosphor paper, leaving a slowly fading trail of brilliant green light in its wake.

A highlight of the presentation was Lien's illustration of the difference between incandescent and LED lumens in two commercial projects. He was able to light these respective parking lots using only 1/3 of the footcandles required in their company standards with better security video clarity and a higher perceived level of brightness. He attributes this to the color temperature and color rendering of the LEDs which increases visual contrast. Mark also briefly spoke about a fascinating application of nanotechnology which is being developed by Taiwanese scientists, and which has successfully been applied to the leaves of trees along a freeway causing them to glow, and scientists to dream of someday lighting these roads without streetlamps!


EMERGING TECHNOLOGY : THE CONVERGENCE OF LEDS AND DIGITAL CONTROLS
Presenter: David Ranieri
By Haley Laurence, University of Sydney

We all know that the lighting industry is being impacted and changed by LED technology, which has the potential to drive major change in the way we use light. According to David Ranieri, LED sales have increased 8% since 2008, now accounting for $1.1 billion dollars of the market. This number is sure to rise significantly over the coming years as functional aspects of LEDs catch up to their promised potential. Much of this can be done through the use of controls, which aid in delivering the ""right light"" for each application. Similarly to the way in which cell phones have transitioned away from being devices primarily used to make phone calls into multi-functional hand held computers, LEDs can be utilized as much more than just a light source.

Rather than being a separate lighting element, LEDs can now be part of the architecture, seamlessly integrated into our surrounding environments. They can then be localized and controlled as needed to react to individual users needs within each space, resulting in greater functionality and reduced energy waste. As Richard Seymour stated in the keynote address, the technology is already there we just have to figure out how to use it. We are limited only by our imagination.


COLOR SPACES AND PLANCKIAN LOCI : ALL THOSE CRAZY COLOR METRICS
Presenters: Naomi Miller, FIALD; Michael Royer, Ph.D.
By Noele DeLeon, Parsons The New School For Design

Naomi Miller, FIALD, and Michael Royer dissected the complex topic of color metrics and translated it in a way that made it comprehensible to the average lighting designer. They began the lecture with common light source spectral power distributions, object reflectivity, and the human visual system's sensitivity to these signals. Then they dove into explaining the three CIE chromaticity diagrams where the Plankian Loci lives.

Although the chromaticity diagrams look relatively the same, each one is different and has specific uses. The original CIE 1931 diagram with x, y coordinates is used for color mixing and showing gamut area. Because this diagram is not perceptually uniform, the CIE 1960 chromaticity diagram with u, v coordinates was created for calculating Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Duv. Duv in this diagram shows that even though two sources may have the same CCT, their quality of white light may be very different (pinkish or greenish). In 1976 there was a need for an even more uniform chromaticity diagram and it was translated again with u', v' coordinates to represent color shift. Because LEDs and other phosphor-coated sources are popular tools for lighting designers, color maintenance and tolerances (shown with the overlay of MacAdam ellipses) are essential to comprehend. Naomi and Michael explained that as complex as these diagrams are, the dimension of lightness is still not included and a more proper diagram of color should be three-dimensional.

The lecture progressed to cover other color metrics of light sources including Color Rendering Index (CRI), CRI with the addition of R9, Color Quantity Scale (CQS), and several others. Of these metrics, CRI has been adopted by the lighting community, however, is still has its weaknesses. CRI with R9, CQS, Color Preference Index, Memory Colors and many more are being explored because there are still many qualities of white light that need to be quantified before lighting designers can confidently rely on color metrics.

Naomi and Michael end the presentation with a fantastic demonstration of various light sources illuminating colored glassware proving their point that the best way to measure these scenarios is with your eyes. The remarkable candor between Naomi and Michael during this presentation was not only entertaining but also very successful in simplifying the highly complicated information.


SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE LIGHTING DESIGNER
Presenters: Paul Beale, IALD; Cindy Foster-Warthen; Jennifer Jones, CAE, IOM
By Mariam Saifan, The University of Kansas

When a lighting design firm gets online and into the social media network, the first statement that may arise is ""We don't get it and what should we talk about?"" Over one billion people use Facebook and other social media outlets such as Twitter, or LinkedIn. When starting out by showcasing a design firm online, it is important to build a circle of friends or organizations that have interest in lighting design. The firm should always post content that is relative to their mission and should understand their persona. A firm's persona could be business-like, funny, creative, or inspirational. Once the persona is determined, information relating to the firm should be posted.
 
Content creation and curation is important and should be delivered in an organized and consistent manner. One could find other relative content from the internet such as pictures or articles and post them. Their online persona should be like a museum, filled with relevant information. Aside from posting relative content, one should showcase the firm's work, such as projects they are working on or projects that inspire them. The firm should be proud and notify their social media circle of any awards that were received or share images of what is taking place in the office.
 
The key importance in social media is to create a relationship with the audience. Although a firm may not have as many ""likes"" on Facebook, it is important to have at least a few quality fans rather than a lot of numbers that don't lead to any business or relationships.


SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE LIGHTING DESIGNER
Presenters: Paul Beale, IALD; Cindy Foster-Warthen; Jennifer Jones, CAE, IOM
By Laura Alferes, The Pennsylvania State University

Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn. Yes, we all know them as social networking. It's a growing ""enlightenment"" for lighting designers worldwide. Those who dwell in the dark of not knowing what lighting is, it's an art. A science. A passion. It's more than just placing fixtures in a space, and voila, let there be light! It's about understanding human response and visual experience when entering and occupying a space. This is where social networking comes into play.

Firms, from small to large, have the opportunity to get their name out into the world and showoff their craft. They are capable of gaining business; learning and communicating with one another, and even inspire young professionals and students, like me. Most importantly, the world of lighting can be exposed and appreciated.

Social media should reflect you, the lighting designer. Touch up your website or network with your personality, the firm's personality; and share your passion. Know your audience and the reputation you want to acquire. With that said, be aware of quality vs. quantity. The amount of users or followers doesn't reflect quality of relationships. Instead, look for those who have many followers and whom they follow, for it's a great way to follow quality firms. Build your foundation!

One thing that really resonated with me was one of the five social media fails: DON'T BE AFRAID TO FAIL. I smiled with relief when I heard this because it's motivating to know that not only does it apply to my childhood and young adult life lessons, but also to professionals in the real world. Learn from your mistakes. Try and try again. People are listening, even if they don't respond back. Social networking for the lighting designer is an added value to business and relationships.