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IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2010 : PAOLA ANTONELLI'S INSPIRING KEYNOTE ADDRESS ON WHAT'S 'NEXT' IN DESIGN ENERGIZES MORE THAN 300 ATTENDEES

IALD Enlighten Americas 2010More than 300 lighting professionals from around the world attended IALD Enlighten Americas 2010, held in Denver, Colorado USA, 7-9 October. In this age of increasingly restrictive energy codes, and with significant outside pressures upon lighting designers' work, how do we get back to what is the most seminal element of what we do - design?

 

Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), kicked off the conference with an inspiring keynote address all about design, how it has evolved over the years and what she expects it to be in the future.


Antonelli's passion for design was evident as she spoke with such enthusiasm about some of the pieces and installations she has secured for the MOMA. Perhaps the most intriguing forms of art were examples of nanodesign in which designers gave shape and life to nanotechnology. She also presented designs for debate, including a battery engraved "Shine On Dad" that contained a deceased father's gastric juices to be used in a flashlight, for example, to keep the energy flowing. Other examples included digital urns - what will happen to our digital remains after we pass?

 

"We need to bring design closer to people so they understand the importance of it," Antonelli reminded attendees. "Design has so much more meaning than just the creation of cute objects, it's about human creativity."


Named one of the 25 most incisive design visionaries by TIME magazine, Antonelli set the tone and sparked a lasting energy that had attendees talking about the session for the duration of the conference. 

 

"With 'Design' as the theme for this year's conference, we were very fortunate to have Paola Antonelli as this year's keynote speaker," said IALD President Katherine Abernathy, IALD. "It's always a pleasure to have someone outside of our industry share their thoughts on design."


With design on the brain, attendees were focused and ready to learn. The educational seminars at IALD Enlighten Americas 2010 once again featured a design, current issues and business track.  A reoccurring issue among attendees was the increasing number of energy codes and standards that lighting designers must adhere to. Oftentimes lighting designers find themselves wrapped up in meeting certain codes and standards, and losing sight of the importance of their role, to create an aesthetically pleasing, quality lighting design.

 

"As lighting designers, we must strive to achieve mandated environmental benchmarks while not losing focus on our greatest strength: the ability to craft quality lit environments using our unique knowledge of light and its intrinsic characteristics," said Abernathy.

 

The Town Hall Meeting, which is always the last session of the conference, allowed attendees to share their opinions on important topics facing lighting designers today and in the future. Moderated by John Martin, IALD Public Policy, the meeting focused on three main topics: the pros and cons of the Color Quality Scale (CQS) and taking a position, lighting design 2020, and capitalizing on economic recovery as a lighting designer. Some attendees were in favor of the CQS and encouraged a position be taken on the metric. Others felt it might only be a marketing tool. In terms of lighting design in the next ten years, many believed there would be new business models. To capitalize on the economic recovery, designers felt strongly about influencing local and regional architects and policymakers, and marketing the human factor of lighting design.

 

IALD Enlighten Americas 2010 was one of the best conferences yet, providing attendees feeling refreshed and energized. Please save the date for IALD Enlighten Americas 2011 to be held 22-24 September 2011, location to be determined.Click here to view more pictures.


DID YOU MISS THE IALD CREDENTIALING UPDATE WEBINAR OR THE SESSION AT IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS?

Click here [https://irtb.webex.com/irtb/lsr.php?AT=pb&SP=EC&rID=2777632&rKey=ad86e9d95814ccb2] to access the full recording of the session, which includes an overview of the credentialing process, the feasibility study the IALD taskforce is undertaking, and the Q&A session featuring questions from both the live audience and webinar attendees. The duration of this session is 1 hour and 10 minutes.

 

The IALD is collecting feedback from industry parties to support its feasibility study. Please email feedback@iald.org with your questions and/or comments.

 

Also read, "What are Credentialing and Certification, and Why is IALD Taking up this Discussion?", "Choosing to Pursue Licensure vs. Certification," and "IALD Credentialing Task Force Continues its Efforts on Architectural Lighting Designer Certification Study."


LIGHTING CROSS TALK PROVES ADVANTAGEOUS FOR SPECIFIERS AND MANUFACTURERS

Lighting Cross Talk 2010The popular Lighting Cross Talk session had a new day and time at this year's conference. Instead of early Saturday morning, Lighting Cross Talk was held in the afternoon on Friday allowing for a more convenient time. Twenty manufacturers and 100 specifiers participated in the session.

 

The round table format features a fast-paced, two-hour information gathering session. Manufacturers are placed at separate tables and have 25 minutes with five specifiers at a time. Manufacturers take this time to introduce new product, get feedback on existing product and talk about other specifier concerns.

 

Cross Talk 2010 The topic of discussion among most of the specifiers revolved around LEDs. Specifiers were concerned with the number of options and the different types of LEDs on the market. They want more details about the life of the product, would like to see a sample room using LEDs and see an LED with more glare control. Other discussions were specific to each of the manufacturers.

 

Each specifier who visits all of their assigned tables is eligible to enter a drawing to win a prize. This year the prize was an Amazon Kindle. Congrats to Dr. Kevin Houser, Educator IALD! Thank you to all the manufacturers and specifiers who participated in this year's Lighting Cross Talk.

 

Acuity Brands

Beta LED

B-K Lighting + Teka Illumination

Cooper Lighting

Erco Lighting

ETC

Focal Point

GE Consumer + Industrial

Kurt Versen

Lighting Services Inc

Lutron Electronics

Osram Sylvania

Philips Day-Brite

Philips Lightolier

Philips Lumileds

Specialty Lighting Industries

Tivoli

Traxon Technologies

Xicato

Zumtobel Lighting


A RECAP OF IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS FROM THE STUDENTS' PERSPECTIVES

Seminars 2


Enlighten Americas 2010 featured three concurrent seminar tracks in business, design and current issues. To read full summaries of each session please click on the appropriate links. Thank you to all students who volunteered to write a summary. To contact students click on their names.

DESIGN TRACK

THE WORK OF ELECTROLAND: SMOKE, MIRRORS AND ELECTRONICS
INSPIRATION AND LIGHT
SEVEN EXPRESSIONS OF LIGHT
RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING DESIGNS PULLED OUT OF THIN AIR
DESIGNING WITH LIGHT: VALUABLE, DELIGHTFUL AND RISKY!

CURRENT ISSUES TRACK

LIGHTING REGULATIONS: GOOD, BAD AND UGLY
DESIGN FOR THE HUMAN ANIMAL
LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY AND ENERGY POVERTY AT A CROSSROADS
LIVING BUILDINGS – A DESIGN LED INITIATIVE FOR INTEGRATING ENERGY AND DESIGN
THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH FOR LIGHTING DESIGNERS

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRACK

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN ACTION : GETTING ALONG TO GET THINGS DONE
EXPLAINED: FACEBOOK AND TWITTER FOR BUSINESS
PRESENTATION SKILLS PART 1: 5 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF A PERSUASIVE PRESENTATION
PRESENTATION SKILLS PART 2: ANATOMY OF A PRESENTATION: TRICKS OF THE TRADE
THE DESIGN PROBLEM? ME?


THE WORK OF ELECTROLAND: SMOKE, MIRRORS AND ELECTRONICS

Cameron McNall and Damon Seeley
By Haley Laurence, University of Sydney, Australia

This session began with a still image from the film L.A. Story where Steve Martin's character is hugging an electronic billboard emblazoned with the words "Hug Me."" This interrelationship between humans and their surroundings, as well as the use of technology to facilitate interaction between the two, is at the very core of Electroland's very own design aesthetic. Electroland, the brain child of Cameron McNall and Damon Seeley, seeks to explore ways in which light can be manipulated to transform environments. Preferring to work in large scale, and what is described by their own account as ""absurdity"", they often consider their projects to be social experiments which function as an exploration of how people and spaces interact.

McNall and Seeley, who introduced themselves as ""designers of experiences"" rather than lighting designers, are remarkably deliberate in the way they control light and shadows, as well as the very people within their spaces. This unique approach results in very public and accessible pieces that enable play and performance among anyone that encounters them. As Seeley himself stated, ""People want to perform, they just need a space to be created in which to do so."" Electroland, naturally, does just that, and they do it brilliantly.



INSPIRATION AND LIGHT
Graham Phoenix, IALD
By Josephine Pan, University of California Davis, USA

To get inspiration, we can look at the different types of light: living light, discovered light, imagined light, created light and spiritual light. Living light is the most basic type of light. It is how our eyes see light physically. Discovered light is the raw light in our natural environment. Light in its purest form shed from the sun is daylight and sunlight. Imagined light is how we recreate and represent light, without the confinements of technology. Created light is lighting design presently. Even though created light is limited to today's technology, it is ever-changing and advancing. Lastly, spiritual light is light perceived by our emotions; our feelings are influenced by heavenly lights. Spiritual light is buried deep within ourselves and can only be discovered through self-searching. And when we combine spirituality and design in totality, immersing our whole self to discovering light, it creates successful lighting design. ""Look in your inner light to find the greatest inspiration,"" Graham Phoenix tells the audience.



SEVEN EXPRESSIONS OF LIGHT
Sponsored by iGuzzini
Charles G. Stone II, FIALD
By Anna Rocki, McGill University, Canada

Presented with poise and humour, Charles Stone's seminar revolved around seven conceptual themes which lighting designer's could use to focus their ideas and clearly communicate their design concept to others, whether they are clients or members of their own design team. Punctuated with clips from films such as Chicago – which became the wakeup call for audience members adjusting to the early hour—and Blade Runner, Mr. Stone illustrated his chosen expressions through his firm's work and explained the strategies used to reinforce the design intent and architecture of the project. Lighting can create a soothing ambiance in a private residence through cove lighting, hidden sources and reflections; it can also transform a user's experience and perception of a space. Addressing the students, Mr. Stone emphasized the use of on-site mock-ups to confirm design and equipment choices stating, ""No matter what the catalogue says, you need to turn the lights on."" He completed the presentation with examples of how lighting can support, connect, define and contour. In breaking down an idea to its fundamental elements and using concise statements, a lighting designer can adopt this methodology in his design process as the concept crystallizes from ephemera into concrete form.



RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING DESIGNS PULLED OUT OF THIN AIR
Gregg Mackell, IALD; Patrick Quigley, IALD; and Deborah Witte, IALD
By Lorin Bordeville, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Canada

""Residential Lighting Designs Pulled out of Thin Air"" presented by Deborah Witte, IALD; Patrick Quigley, IALD; and Gregg Mackell, IALD, provided three interesting perspectives, three sets of solutions for three different design styles. Deborah provided views into stunning finished projects, and discussed the technical requirements to arrive at each solution. She demonstrated the challenges of different fixtures, inadequacies in manufactured products and the limitations of technology. Patrick led an entertaining and educational dialogue of client needs and demands, and how sometimes the unexpected provides for an exceptional result. He showed attendees the intent of light, secondary focal points and how a space should be dressed and clothed in multi-layered lighting solutions. Gregg led a fun, playful and informative journey through lighting design problems where there was either no criteria/direction or where no alterations could be made to the existing architecture/finish. We explored some of the more unique problems he's solved by embracing the underlying architecture (geometry) of a space or the client's intent. No formula works here, simply respect the architecture and it will respect (or reward) you the designer. What can be taken away from this seminar (not including a number of hard-sought, much -coveted lamps and screens) is that in design, there is no answer without a question. And, even if expensive fixtures are left outside, in order to attain the desired patina, they can still be used. There is always a solution, and compromises can always be made – sometimes to results unimagined.



DESIGNING WITH LIGHT: VALUABLE, DELIGHTFUL AND RISKY!

Victor Palacio, IALD
By Brittney Bushman, Colorado State University, USA

Design, by profession, is a process of decision making. Victor Palacio, IALD, emphasized that so-called ""simple"" decisions have the potential to be very important decisions, impacting the health, safety and well-being of those who enter any given space. Bad decisions made throughout the design process often result in poor quality lighting design. As the discussion focused on the delight of designing with light, Palacio was a delight himself. Being very enjoyable, witty and personable, he captured the attention of the audience. He shared that after working with a lighting designer, people often exclaim ""I wish I had your job!"" expressing the excitement that light can illuminate within us all.

In addition to making good decisions and finding joy while designing with light, designers also need to be aware of risks they currently face today with technology, codes and veering away from their traditional scope of work as a lighting designer. Palacio closed the session on a positive note by sharing the opportunities provided when designing with light, particularly regarding health and light. As the best raw material to work with, light has the ability to shape spaces and human behavior; designers should embrace this joyous opportunity!



LIGHTING REGULATIONS: GOOD, BAD AND UGLY
Cheryl English, Moderator; Jack Bailey, Associate IALD; Nancy Clanton, IALD; Pam Horner; Glenn Heinmiller, IALD; John Martin.

Led by a panel of experienced lighting and policy professionals, ""Lighting Regulations : Good, Bad and Ugly"" provided attendees with an update of current codes and standards. John Martin, IALD Public Policy, began the discussion with an overview of what public policy means to the IALD and how members can get involved. IALD Energy and Sustainability Chair Glenn Heinmiller, IALD, presented the current status of several codes and standards. Heinmiller also explained several future trends to look out for including stretch codes and increased efficiency. Cheryl English moderated the discussion and focused on the future of these codes and standards, and the impact it will have on lighting designers.



DESIGN FOR THE HUMAN ANIMAL
James Benya, FIALD, and Deborah Burnett, ASID
By Haley Laurence, University of Sydney, Australia

The 1939 World's Fair introduced two things that changed our lives forever – fluorescent lighting and air conditioning. In ""Design for the Human Animal"" James Benya, FIALD, illustrated just how these new technologies allowed us to spend more time indoors away from daylight. Over seventy years later we are still feeling the repercussions and are working conscientiously to bring daylight back into our environments. Providing invaluable calculations and scientific research, Benya went on to discuss many challenges that arise when incorporating daylighting into a space, closing with a challenge – that we all work to become better daylight designers by using what nature has provided and begin to consider daylight as our primary source of light. This challenge led to Deborah Burnett's discussion of the correlation between light and health. Scientific studies show that we spend 90% of our time indoors and receive 60% of light from indoor lighting. Burnett passionately discussed many ways in which lighting affects our biological clocks, hormone levels, sleep and cognition. After this lecture I realize now more than ever that as lighting designers it is vital to be certain we are using the best possible light in every environment, because we are not only affecting the aesthetical value of the spaces we create, but also the health and well being of the people that inhabit them.



LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY AND ENERGY POVERTY AT A CROSSROADS

Chad Groshart, IALD and Craig Bernecker, Ph.D.
By Yulia Tyukhova, University of Nebraska Lincoln, USA

Chad Groshart, IALD, and Craig Bernecker discussed the importance of improving quality of life in developing worlds by using lighting technology. The enhancement of quality of life is one of the essential, central goals that lighting plays in people's lives. About 1.6 billion out of 6.8 billion people in the world don't have access to electricity. Replacing the traditional sources of light such as kerosene, candles and others with modern lighting technologies will serve the goal of providing basic needs and enhancing life. Modern sources such as solar-powered flashlights and LED systems have less impact on air pollution and health, and have minimal safety hazards and maintenances costs, while also providing opportunities for education. Lighting should be designed for people. The best lighting environments provide basic visual needs, define spaces, create specific atmospheres, reveal architecture and play many more roles. To achieve well-considered lighting solutions it is extremely important to deal with lighting as a unique combination of its artistic and engineering sides. We, as lighting designers and professionals in this field, have to contribute to this problem by providing deliberate lighting solutions in our everyday applications. We also have to keep in mind that energy poverty exists in developing worlds, and energy resources are limited.



LIVING BUILDINGS – A DESIGN-LED INITIATIVE FOR INTEGRATING ENERGY AND DESIGN

Fred Oberkircher, Educator IALD, and Rob Guglielmetti
By Lindy Balls, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA

In ""Living Buildings – A Design-led Initiative for Integrating Energy and Design,"" Fred Oberkircher, Educator IALD, and Rob Guglielmetti identified the components of design-led building initiatives, explored historic examples of the Living Buildings systems, discussed the pros and cons of annual Energy Use Intensity (EUI) and presented case studies. The current approach to energy assessment, which focuses on energy efficiency, has limitations which can be illustrated in comparing a Hummer with a Prius. Although a Prius boasts an efficiency of 50mpg while a Hummer attains only 10mpg, total energy consumption may be significantly greater for a Prius as utilization is increased. Calculating efficiency of a product fails to represent total energy consumed; however, codes emphasize efficiency and ignore actual consumption.

A prescriptive modeling process tells us the answer to a given problem, i.e. codes. Performance modeling encourages creative problem solving by giving overarching goals without providing the answer. A design-based performance process includes the following steps: (1) integrated design team; (2) determine building integrated design goals; (3) determine aggressive annual energy consumption goals; (4) ideate collaborative building system; (5) test/simulate solutions; and (6) construct the building.

Nature uses evolution, the ultimate performance based metric. To achieve progress, it is important to produce data that will enable better decisions for the future. Sharing the database of knowledge and experience is key in making significant changes – and we can't get there by simply reducing 10% every year.



THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH FOR LIGHTING DESIGNERS
Sponsored by Finelite
Nancy Clanton, IALD; Ken Douglas, IALD; Mary Claire Frazier, IALD; and David Ghatan, IALD
By Andrew Ininns, University of Colorado-Boulder, USA

This session focused on whether or not lighting designers should adopt the hippocratic oath, ""First, do no wrong."" The talk was unique in that it was not in the typical lecture format common to most conferences. Instead, the speakers asked ethical questions, such as ""Should you take a project if it is ethically wrong from a human rights standpoint?"" and ""Blue-white light may be more visually effective, but it may also interfere with circadian rhythm – which is the more important design constraint?"" The speakers then opened the ethical questions up to the room, giving attendees the opportunity to state and refute their opinions. Much ground was covered by the attendees, as some claimed that they would never take an unethical project while others stated that if they did not take a project, someone else would, and would probably do it even more unethically. For the most part, everyone agreed that harm to people or the environment should be avoided, but that there are few ultimatums in a design industry. In the end, no concrete decision was made, but a younger audience member summarized the main conclusions of the discussion well: that education, legal satisfaction, policy, safety and comfort of occupants, environmental stewardship and aesthetics are our tools and goals for making the consequences of our work as ethical as possible.



EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN ACTION : GETTING ALONG TO GET THINGS DONE
Merit Gest

Merit Gest led a discussion on emotional intelligence – how we get along with other people. Her main point was ""It's time to G.R.O.W. Up!"" She explained her philosophy that if you ground yourself in reality about you, re-decide decisions that no longer serve you, own your power and work your plan for more, then you will achieve more, be frustrated less and have a lot more fun in the process. Her presentation also explained 15 attributes of emotional intelligence that can be measured including self-regard, emotional self-awareness, independence, impulse control, flexibility, among others. She also discussed ways to overcome stress.



EXPLAINED : FACEBOOK AND TWITTER FOR BUSINESS
John Kuehl

In John Kuehl's ""Explained : Facebook and Twitter for Business,"" he explained the basic structure of both Facebook and Twitter, their strengths and strategies, and meaningful metrics to determine success. The first part of the session was used to gauge the group's baseline knowledge and opinion of each business tool. Some attendees used Facebook and Twitter on a regular basis to promote their businesses, while others thought it was a waste of time. Kuehl explained that there were essentially three ways Facebook and Twitter could be used as a business tool – news and promotion, thought leadership or networking. He recommended engaging with other people to build your following. Kuehl recommends using Google Analytics to measure return on investment of social networking sites as well as websites.



PRESENTATION SKILLS PART 1 : 5 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF PERSUASIVE PRESENTATION
Kristin Charles, Ph. D.
By Yuduo Zhao, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Being a lesson on how to give good presentations, this lecture naturally had to practice what it preached. Kristin Charles, Ph.D., started with a personal anecdote of the history of a certain church in the American Midwest that started facing serious direct solar glare problems in 2005. She used this as an example throughout her presentation to relate her different points to the lighting profession. She then moved on to toss baseballs and Play-Doh at the audience to demonstrate the communication model of sender, receiver, channel, message and interference. She stated a good presentation should be flexibly delivered according to the audience. This was followed by the five steps of Monroe's Motivated Sequence: gain attention, create anxiety/need, satisfy need, visualization and gain commitment. Dr. Charles rendered the information about each step easily by giving plenty of vivid examples and clear explanations. She also eagerly answered all audience questions with illuminating insight. Overall, Kristin Charles delivered an entertaining, professional and enlightening lecture, easily one of my favorites.



PRESENTATION SKILLS PART 2 : ANATOMY OF A PRESENTATION : TRICKS OF THE TRADE

Kristin Charles, Ph.D.

Dr. Kristin Charles's second session focused on the basics of a presentation's organization and audience engagement. She started the session with a group activity on the myths of PowerPoint presentations and presentations in general. After determining organization is key in any presentation, she began to talk about the macro and micro aspects of a presentation's organization. Charles described the five main features an introduction must have – get attention, establish credibility, state purpose, state objectives and preview main points. She also talked about how to organize main point and what to include in a conclusion. After reviewing how to organize a presentation, Charles spoke about how one should handle side-track conversations and tactics to engage the audience.



THE DESIGN PROBLEM? ME?

Jeffery Miller, IALD, and Chauncey Bell
By Terry Charron, Otis College of Art & Design

If lighting designers do not get the word out that there is more to their craft than just lighting, the profession could get absorbed by manufacturers, architects or other types of designers. That was the main point of the seminar ""The Design Problem? Me?"" led by IALD Immediate Past President Jeff Miller, IALD, of Design Advocacy Light, and Chauncey Bell, Managing Director of Pacific Northwest Financial Services. This was an excellent seminar to end this year's IALD conference, because it demonstrated how designers today should consider broadcasting the theory that ""lighting does not only have to be pleasing to the eye, but affects every aspect of our lives."" Deborah Burnett, ASID, CMG, speaker during ""Design for The Human Animal"", reminded attendees how important color, light and circadian rhythm are to the health and welfare of people. A lighting designer's expertise is required far beyond aesthetics and can have great impact on humans' well being. This seminar stimulated much conversation about the other seminars held this year and how diverse lighting designers are. It is extremely important to let everyone know there is more to lighting design than lighting the inside or outside of a building.


GET TO KNOW THE NEWEST FELLOWS INDUCTED INTO THE IALD COLLEGE OF FELLOWS

The IALD is pleased to welcome four new members to the IALD College of Fellows. The IALD Fellow designation is awarded to members of the IALD for valuable contribution to the art and science of lighting design, and for their continued service to the IALD. Fellows are professional members with a minimum number of ten years experience. The following Fellows were inducted last week during IALD Enlighten Americas 2010 in Denver, CO USA.

 

DAVID BIRD, FIALD

2 B Designed Pty. Ltd

Hawthorn, Australia

David has over 23 years of lighting design experience and has completed projects large and small throughout Australia, New Zealand, Southeast Asia and the United States. He joined the IALD as a Professional Member in 1992. Since then, he has served on the IALD Board of Directors, its membership committee, and was instrumental in the development of a committee in Australia to expand the IALD's membership base by arranging local events and lectures. The Melbourne and Sydney regions now hold three to four meetings per year. David's current role with the IALD is as the regional coordinator for Melbourne.


C
ANDACE M. KLING, FIALD

C.M. Kling & Associates

Alexandria, VA USA

Candace KlingCandace has been in the field of lighting for over 40 years. She has advanced public awareness of the lighting design profession by creating intelligent, responsive and responsible lighting designs. She has created guidelines for public use in the hospitality industry that result in a better understanding of what good lighting means to the end users. Her lighting lectures have influenced countless design students to pay greater attention to the quality of light, and the need for lighting designers. Candace has been a member of the IALD Membership Committee and spent two years serving on the Board of Directors.  She has also been a judge for the IALD International Lighting Design Awards, and currently serves on the LIRC Steering Committee.

 

JOHN MARSTELLER, FIALD

TSLEAG - The Spatial Light Environments

Geneva, Switzerland

John Marsteller has received numerous lighting awards and writes frequently for international design magazines. He has participated in three lecture-training tours of China, last being in Shanghai at Lux Pacifica, the first Pacific Basin lighting conference ever held. Most recently he was the feature speaker at the joint Australian/New Zealand Lighting Convention held in Auckland and at LIGHTFAIR International 2010 speaking on international lighting design.

 

CHARLES STONE, FIALD

Fisher Marantz Stone

New York, NY USA

C StoneCharles has designed award-winning and well-known projects such as Carnegie Hall, the Washington Monument, American Museum of Natural History - Rose Center for Earth and Space in New York City, and the new Hong Kong Airport. His passion and experience in lighting design has also led him to traverse the globe, speaking at various conferences and universities including AIA lectures, design symposiums in Europe and recently, The Feltman Lecture at Cooper Union in New York City. Charles is Lighting Certified by the National Council on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions as well as a LEED Accredited Professional. In addition, he was President of the International Association of Lighting Designers from 2004 to 2005.


STUDENT ATTENDEES ENJOY HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES AND SPECIAL STUDENT-ONLY WORKSHOPS AT IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2010

 

Students 2010Each year, IALD Enlighten Americas welcomes the best and brightest lighting students to participate in hands-on student activities and to network alongside lighting professionals from around the world. With more than 30 students and more student activities, IALD Enlighten Americas 2010 provided students an unforgettable lighting experience.

 

Students were taken to the University of Colorado - Boulder to begin their first student activity - LightPlay, a lighting design charette led by leading designers, allowing professionals to share their lighting knowledge directly with students. This year the exercise involved a box of random props, the University campus, a video camera and their creativity. Students were put in teams that included a mix of engineering and theatrical lighting design students. At the end of the activity students submitted a 30 second video of light that was revealed at the Opening President's Reception sponsored by Cooper Lighting. Guests at the reception bought tickets to submit their votes for their favorite video. The popular votes went to Team Yellow, Purple and Green. All proceeds went to the IALD Education Trust. 

 

In addition to LightPlay, students had the opportunity to have their portfolios reviewed by lighting professionals during networking breaks. Students also had two special workshops during the conference. David Ghatan, IALD, and Lara Cordell, LC, led a student workshop that served as a Q&A session. Many students took this time to ask David and Lara about the specifics of being a lighting designer such as the hours, travel and office atmosphere. They also asked for interview tips, and when and if to take certain certification exams.

 

Rogier van der Heide of Philips Lighting flew in to give a special workshop for students. Leland Curtis of Pennsylvania State University gives his account of the session below.

 

SPECIAL LIGHTING WORKSHOP BY ROGIER VAN DER HEIDE

By Leland Curtis, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 

Who is Richard Kelly? Thirty students refused to answer. Could we really not know about the brilliant designer who helped define the lighting design profession? Certainly some of us should have been familiar with the terms Focal Glow, Ambient Luminescence and Play of Brilliance that he used to describe his ground-breaking designs. To be honest, I didn't have the slightest idea who Richard Kelly was, but after hearing Rogier van der Heide describe him and his work, I will never forget. I sat there awestruck as Rogier, an icon to any student familiar with his work, taught us about one of his own greatest inspirations. As he went through design after design, pointing out the various ways that Richard Kelly's ideas enhanced the architecture and brought emotion to the various spaces, he encouraged us to be active observers and to interpret Kelly's terms for ourselves. "Logic can get you from A to B," he said with a smile, "but imagination will take you everywhere." The excitement in his voice was unmistakable, and it clearly had an impact on the crowd of students that hovered around him after his talk. Although few of us began the session with an understanding of the history of lighting design, we all left with a shared desire to learn more.


EVENING EVENTS AND NETWORKING HOURS REMAIN ATTENDEES MOST VALUED ASPECT OF CONFERENCE

Time and again, attendees say the amount of networking offered at IALD Enlighten Americas is the most valued aspect of the conference. This year was no exception - evening events and special networking hours provided attendees several opportunities to meet new colleagues and reconnect with old ones. Thank you to Cooper Lighting, Acuity Brands and Philips Lightolier for sponsoring the wonderful evening and events, and to the Lighting Industry Resource Council (LIRC) for sponsoring the Young Professionals Networking Hour!

 

Cooper 2010The President's Opening Reception, sponsored by Cooper Lighting, provided attendees a relaxed and elegant backdrop to reconnect and meet friends and colleagues. The room was decorated with deep oranges, reds and yellows to depict a fall day in the woods of Colorado. IALD President Katherine Abernathy, IALD, and Lance Bennett of Cooper Lighting welcomed everyone to the event, while Charles Stone, FIALD, provided commentary on each of the LightPlay videos.

 




Acuity 2010Friday Evening's Dinner Reception, sponsored by Acuity Brands, embraced the western theme revealing everyone's inner cowboy. Attendees enjoyed having their caricatures drawn, panning for gold, timing their quick-draw and dancing the two-step. Cheryl English of Acuity Brands was arrested by the IALD Education Trust Sheriff, Mark Roush, and taken to jail. Thankfully folks at the event contributed to the $200 USD bail to get Cheryl out of jail.

 



 



Philips 2010The Saturday Evening Gala Closing Reception, sponsored by Philips Lightolier, was the perfect closing to a design-focused conference. Held at the Denver Museum of Contemporary Art, the reception provided attendees a beautiful venue to discuss their favorite sessions and topics at this year's conference. Attendees enjoyed the music of a wonderful jazz ensemble, the inspirational art and the view of the Denver skyline from the rooftop.

 

Back by popular demand, the Educators Networking Hour and the Young Professionals Networking Hour (sponsored by LIRC), gave educators and young professionals an opportunity to network with one another. Educators shared their thoughts on maintaining and growing lighting programs in schools, while young professionals spoke about their experiences thus far in the industry.


POST-CONFERENCE SURVEY NOW AVAILABLE

Enlighten Americas 2010 was the most attended conference to date, and we hope you enjoyed it as much as we did.

To help us improve future conferences, please take a few minutes to complete the following survey. We appreciate your feedback on Enlighten Americas 2010: It's all about the D. Design, held this year in Denver, CO USA, 7-9 October 2010.

 
If you've already completed the survey - thank you very much. Your comments will be used to help plan future conferences. If you haven't completed the survey please click here to take the survey or copy and paste the link in to your web browser http://iald.me/alU4uO.

We look forward to seeing you next year at Enlighten Americas 2011!

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2010 SPONSORS AND VOLUNTEERS

IALD ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2010 SPONSORS  

 

THE IALD GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES THE GENEROUS SUPPORT OF THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS: 

GOLD SPONSORS

B-K Lighting and Teka Illumination

Philips Day-Brite

 

SILVER SPONSORS

Focal Point

Xicato

 

BRONZE SPONSORS

Beta LED

Lighting Services Inc

Osram Sylvania

Traxon Technologies

Zumtobel Lighting

 

 

EVENT SPONSORS

THURSDAY EVENING PRESIDENT'S OPENING RECEPTION

Cooper Lighting

 

LIGHTPLAY @ ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS 2010

Amerlux
Cooper Lighting

Fisher Marantz Stone

Horton Lees Brogden

Lighting Design Alliance

Sean O'Connor Lighting

Wiedenbach-Brown Co Inc

FRIDAY MORNING BREAKFAST BUFFET

Kurt Versen Company

 

FRIDAY BUFFET LUNCHEON

Sistemalux Group

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON NETWORKING BREAK

Lutron Electronics

 

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING HOUR

Lighting Industry Resource Council (LIRC)

 

FRIDAY EVENING DINNER RECEPTION

Acuity Brands

 

SATURDAY MORNING BREAKFAST BUFFET

Bartco Lighting

 

SATURDAY EVENING CLOSING DINNER RECEPTION

Philips Lightolier

 

 

SEMINAR SPONSORS

SEVEN EXPRESSIONS OF LIGHT

iGuzzini

 

THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH FOR LIGHTING DESIGNERS

Finelite

 

 

ATTENDEE EXPERIENCE SPONSORS

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS FLASHDRIVE

Specialty Lighting Industries

 

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS LEARNING JOURNAL

ETC

 

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS TOTE BAGS

Lutron Electronics

 

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS LANYARDS

ERCO Lighting Inc

 

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS HOTEL KEYCARDS

Vode Lighting

 

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS WATER BOTTLES

Traxon Technologies

 

ENLIGHTEN AMERICAS ROOM DROPS

iO Lighting

Philips Lumileds

 

CONTRIBUTING SPONSOR

Energie Lighting

 

Sponsors as of 22 September 2010



2010 CONFERENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE

This group of volunteers worked tirelessly for the past year to plan Enlighten Americas 2010. Our sincere thanks go to:

Joe Bokelman
ETC
Middleton, WI USA

CJ Brockway, Associate IALD
NBBJ Lighting Group
Seattle, WI USA

Teal Brogden, IALD
Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design
Culver City, WA USA

Mark Elliott, Associate IALD
Point of View
Sydney, NSW Australia
 
David Ghatan, IALD
C.M. Kling & Associates
Alexandria, VA USA

Karen Lee
Osram Sylvania
Danvers, MA USA

Gregg Mackell, IALD
186 Lighting Design Group
Golden, CO USA

Jeffrey Miller, IALD
Pivotal Lighting Design
Seattle, WA USA
 

This year's activities were made possible by the collective efforts of IALD members and their dedication to volunteerism. We especially appreciate the efforts of the following members as they have successfully fulfilled their terms on their respective committees.

IALD VOLUNTEER SERVICE AWARD
Maureen Mahr, IALD
IALD Chicago Regional Coordinator
 
LIRC STEERING COMMITTEE
Melissa Hertel
, Co-Chair
 
MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE
Paul Beale, IALD
Mary Ann Hay, IALD
 
IALD BOARD MEMBERS
Dawn Hollingsworth, IALD
Jeffrey I.L. Miller, IALD
Robert Shook, IALD
 
IALD EDUCATION TRUST BOARD MEMBERS
Paulette Hebert, Educator IALD
Dawn Hollingsworth, IALD
Robert Shook, IALD